Get the FLASH PLAYER to view this magazine:

Get Adobe Flash player

- or -

View as HTML version

www.psi-network.de PSI Journal 8-9/2016 mous. Generally, they only pay for themselves when they are fully loaded. And as we have explained above, this is becoming increasingly unlikely. The fact that the proportion of smaller ships among new vessels is rising again could initiate a reversal of the trend. ECOLOGICALLY QUESTIONABLE DETOURS The fact that fuel costs have fallen sharply due to the low oil price also has an impact on maritime transport – yet sadly not only in a positive sense. For many shipowners, cheap marine diesel only pays off if they make the 6,500 kilometre detour around Africa rather than pay high fees for travelling through the Suez Canal. According to the industry publication SeaIntel (quoted from the news magazine Spiegel), travelling through the Suez Canal costs the container ship Approx. 465,000 dollars; for the Panama Canal it costs 320,000 dollars. Many container ships today travel (most- ly westbound) on routes that were common over 100 years ago and require more time. However, because of the lower freight load on the return voyage, the time loss can be compensated for to some extent because the vessels can then travel faster. This in turn is feasible thanks to cheap fuel. Economically this may make sense, but it comes at the expense of a huge increase in emitted pollutants. For example, CO2 emissions on the Asia-Europe route alone rise by around 6,500 tonnes as a result of the detour to Africa. However, according to SeaIntel, the longer travel times could help to normalise the balance between supply and demand to some extent. A network of differentiated dependencies that are off ten assessed differently by industry information publications as well as various shipowners and freight forwarders. CONTAINER SHIPPING IN A PERSISTENT CRISIS All this paints a gloomy picture of container shipping which is characterized by an unprecedented oversupply of tonnage. Particularly the many small charter shipping companies can barely cover their costs. The international shipping lines, on the other LOADING PLAN WITH EXAMPLES OF TRANSIT TIMES AND ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN Port of shipment Hong Kong Xiamen Shanghai Qingdao Dalian Tianjin FOB to franco domicile Approx. 36 days Approx. 35 days Approx. 36 days Approx. 44 days Approx. 45 days Approx. 41 days Sailings Standard 3 x weekly 3 x weekly 3 x weekly 3 x weekly 3 x weekly 3 x weekly Sailings Express On request On request On request On request On request On request ACTION TO BE TAKEN ENS cut-off Thurs. 28.7.16 Fri. 29.7.16 Fri. 29.7.16 Fri. 29.7.16 Fri. 29.7.16 Fri. 29.7.16 Transfer ‘FOB’ Day 1, Fri. 29.7.16 Day 1, Fri. 29.7.16 Day 1, Mon. 1.8.16 Day 1, Mon. 1.8.16 Day 1, Sun. 31.7.16 Day 1, Sat. 30.7.16 Ship departure Day 5, Day 4, Day 4, Day 4, Day 4, Day 4, Tues. 2.8.16 Mon. 1.8.16 Thu. 4.8.16 Thu. 4.8.16 Wed. 3.8.16 Tues. 2.8.16 Day 31, Day 40, Day 41. Day 38, Wed. 31.8.16 Fri. 9.9.16 Fr.i 9.9.16 Mon. 5.9.16 Ship arrival HAM Day 33, Tues. 30.8.16 Container handling Day 35, Thu. 1.9.16 Import customs clearance Day 35, Thu. 1.9.16 Delivery in DE Day 36, Fri. 2.9.16 Day 33, Tues. 30.8.16 Day 34, Thu. 1.9.16 Day 34, Thu. 1.9.16 Day 35, Fri. 2.9.16 Day 33, Fri. 2.9.16 Day 43. Mon. 12.9.16 Day 33, Fri. 2.9.16 Day 36, Mon. 5.9.16 Day 43. Mon. 12.9.16 Day 44, Tues. 13.9.16 Day 44. Mon. 12.9.16 Day 44. Mon. 12.9.16 Day 45, Tues. 13.9.16 Day 40, Wed. 7.9.16 Day 40, Wed. 7.9.16 Day 41, Thu. 8.9.16 27

Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Page 9
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Page 24
Page 25
Page 26
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Page 32
Page 33
Page 34
Page 35
Page 36
Page 37
Page 38
Page 39
Page 40
Page 41
Page 42
Page 43
Page 44
Page 45
Page 46
Page 47
Page 48
Page 49
Page 50
Page 51
Page 52
Page 53
Page 54
Page 55
Page 56
Page 57
Page 58
Page 59
Page 60
Page 61
Page 62
Page 63
Page 64
Page 65
Page 66
Page 67
Page 68
Page 69
Page 70
Page 71
Page 72
Page 73
Page 74
Page 75
Page 76
Page 77
Page 78
Page 79
Page 80
Page 81
Page 82
Page 83
Page 84
Page 85
Page 86
Page 87
Page 88
Page 89
Page 90
Page 91
Page 92
Page 93
Page 94
Page 95
Page 96
Page 97
Page 98
Page 99
Page 100
Page 101
Page 102
Page 103
Page 104
Page 105
Page 106
Page 107
Page 108
Page 109
Page 110
Page 111
Page 112
Page 113
Page 114
Page 115
Page 116
Page 117
Page 118
Page 119
Page 120
Page 121
Page 122
Page 123
Page 124
Page 125
Page 126
Page 127
Page 128
Page 129
Page 130
Page 131
Page 132
Page 133
Page 134
Page 135
Page 136
Page 137
Page 138
Page 139
Page 140