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www.psi-network.de PSI Journal 1/2016 for sustainable business success thereby is the creative powers of the employees: they bear the company. Investing in their motivation and sense of purpose, their wellbeing, their lasting health, in their understanding of handling resources, the environment and social responsibility is sustainability in practice. Especially in view of the changing demographic factors at the beginning of the 21st century and the acute lack of skilled workers associated with it, new thought and action are urgently indicated. PRACTICAL TIPS FOR CSR Sustainable and holistic company development takes into account the body, mind and spirit of employees (behaviour) as well as body, mind and spirit of the company (conditions). But not only in the company, every individual can also have some im impact in the personal sphere - additionally also inducing others to act in sustainable ways by personal example. The “knowledge magnet”: Keeping knowledge in the company Scenario: The long-serving employee leaves the company (often purely for reasons of age). Method: in a half-year transition period his knowledge relevant to the business is transferred by his (possibly fictional) successor in structured, guided interview situations and is thus made available, bringing further gains. The integrated fitness studio: Mens sana in corpore sano Scenario: Many employees want to do something for themselves but the journey and expense involved are often very high. Method: Cooperation with local fitness and wellness studio. Company receives a very favourable flat rate and passes this on to its employees. A fifth of the fitness time can also be reckoned as working time. Or also the off fer of free use of a fitness studio to staff. Optionally e.g. inspire employees with regard to free, optimally timed opportunities: The healthy break: Healthy eating and communicating with pleasure Scenario: How do I spend my lunch break? Fast food is often expensive and bad. Method: In cooperation with the company doctor a healthy and tasty choice of food is offered. Healthy food offered cheaply, unhealthy meals expensive or food offerings marked with smileys or according to the traffic-light principle. For smaller businesses also feasible in cooperation with health-oriented local caterers. The smart telephone book: Who is really responsible? Scenario: So many topics in the company. But who is responsible? Who really knows their way around? Method: Topic-centred access to the smart, because of expanded telephone book. The employee immediately sees who is respon- sible for the topic, who is an expert, who is interested. Combinable with the knowl- edge map method. The customer parliament: Together to environmentally-friendly products Scenario: Products, logistics, application and recycling leave a lot of room for ecological improvements, which harbour not only an image benefit but also tangible economic benefits. Method: The interested customer often knows best how he will use a product and, if appropriate, dispose of it. Thus his knowledge and ingenuity can provide valuable benefits for the company’s own development and marketing department. And why not even possibly (with the help of the customer) win a sustainability prize? The new human culture: Trust lowers transaction costs Scenario: A culture of mistrust, working under (unnecessary) pressure lowers the lasting performance capability by at least 20 per cent – permanently! The attitude “My knowledge is my power” prevents urgently-needed innovations. Method: Human-centric orientation of the company culture lowers absence and fric- tion loss and at the same time significantly raises innovative power, today’s most important profit factor. Higher efficiency and effectivity through less controlling. More healthy employees through a greater felt sense of purpose. Responsible handling of resources: Less is often more Scenario: Non-renewable Non renewable energies and raw materials are finite, and in addition theirr consumption is often directly harmful to the environment. Method: Gradual conversion to renewable energies. Own use intelligently controlled (ecological footprint). Paying attention to sustainable production and recycling quotas in the case of new products. In the medium term this is often not even more expensive Everyday examples are LED technology in lighting, switchable sockets, thermal insu insulation, heating with solar energy and wood, , etc. Regarding emissions as hidden general costs Scenario: Gases (CO 2 ) and material waste (plastic) in production and consumption burden us all, and what is more, in the long term. Method: Keep an eye on the entire product lifecycle together with the resources and aim one’s own spending power along these lines. Think through the deployment of products to the end. Harmonize subjective need with objective supplies Scenario: The throw-away society often consumes far above its needs and meaningfulness. Method: Observe the “5 Rs rule” of permaculture: Refuse: Refrain from unnecessary consumption. Reduce: Lower necessary consumption. Reuse: Use things again or adapt them to other uses (second hand) Repair: Don’t throw everything away immediately, but repair it if possible Recycle: Recycling mostly consumes 67

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